Wednesday, October 3, 2012

More About Harvests

My friend at Moondance Ranch put up a post about her fall harvest. Unless you've lived on the high prairies (she lives at 6,800 feet while I'm at 6,400) you may not understand just how difficult it is to have any luck with gardens. And I'm convinced, it's all about luck out here!

What with hail:


And temperature extremes:
(Forecast for today; October 3, 2012)


And monthly rainfall measured in hundredths of an inch:

Denver Precipitation
July:     .48
August: .11
(National Weather Service Data)

And wind that blows howls:


A few carefully selected, or more liked, neglected,
vegetables manage to do more than survive... they thrive:


It looks like tonight might be the end of our garden. And if not tonight, temperatures below freezing are forecast for the weekend. We have had our share of squash, a few root vegetables and more than our share of tomatoes. My garden has been quite productive, at least in comparison to past harvests. But, I certainly wouldn't be able to eke out an existence from it if it weren't for the grocery store down the street!

Farewell summer! Winter is on its way!

5 comments:

  1. pretty carrots how did the purple skinned ones taste? :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, Dreaming! Your harvest beats my harvest by a long shot. What variety is that purple carrot? Was it good?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the carroty is a Nantes Red... but I'm not positive. It is the 2nd year I've grown them. I like the purple color, but I really don't taste that much difference. This particular one was a bit large. I was afraid that it might be woody. But, I cooked it with chicken in the crock pot and it seemed to be just fine!

      Delete
  3. What a bountiful harvest. God is really good. I've never seen a red carrot before. This is a first.
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    ReplyDelete

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