Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Got Bugs!

My bugs came!
I wanted to get bugs last year, but I was on a wait list.
Can you believe there are that many people who want bugs?

My bugs are in this bag.
They are microscopic mites that have infected these weeds.
 This is was bindweed.

It is a member of the Morning Glory family.
It grows, well, like a weed!
It strangles other plants.
Bindweed is very resistant to herbicides.

The instructions told me to wrap a few springs of infected bindweed
around the growing tips of bindweed in non-irrigated areas.
They gave me the pointer that the
"growing tip is the end of the stem farthest away from the root."
Geesh... are people that ignorant?
Wait - don't answer that!

The wrapped clump was to be placed 'under' the plant.
They suggested that a rock be placed on top to hold the clump together.

The mites are supposed to travel to the growing bindweed. They'll create galls and will effect the flowers, which will mean seeds won't be produced. Once we see that the weeds in our yard and pasture are infected, we can mow the patches and that will spread the mites. We can also take infected pieces and move them to non-infected areas. In the winter, the mites will move down into the crown and reproduce, making new baby microscopic mites that will continue to infect our weeds. I'll let you know how it works!

17 comments:

  1. fascinating! And once it takes off, you could harvest your infected weeds and sell them! There must be a high demand since there's a waiting list. Just think! Making money selling weed! (the legal kind of course)

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    1. LOL You are right - there may be a huge market!

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  2. interesting- I hope it works for you.

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  3. I will be very interested to hear how well it works. I don't use herbicides, so I've been pulling it out by hand. A big job.

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  4. Sounds good to me I hope it works Bindweed is awful:(

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  5. Sarah's comment had me cracking up! I have never heard of anyone buying mite-infested-weed, but here you go! I learn something new every day and I can't wait to hear about your experience with this all the way through. Are the mites microscopic? Do they impact humans in any way?

    I know nothing about all of this, so it is very fascinating.

    Here's my BIG good luck wish for successful mite transferance!!! And I think that's the first time I've ever THOUGHT or SAID such words! Hahaha!

    Lana

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    1. Thanks - I'm hoping it works, too. At least if it knocks it down a bit, that would be helpful!
      The mites are microscopic and are not supposed to decide to chew on warm-blooded critters.

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  6. Wow, that's an awesome way to go green. We don't herbicide either. Just to worried about all the furkids. Be interesting to see how it works.

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    1. It wasn't just about going green. The weed is resistant to all attempts to curtail it. Pulling it just invites it to spread from the roots. It scoffs at herbicides!

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  7. Very interesting! Way to go green .
    Bet you never thought you would be wishing you had bugs, huh? :)

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    1. You are right about never thinking I'd actually buy bug-infested plants! Our purchase isn't about going green, however. Nothing impacts this weed. It is very difficult to deal with.

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  8. Great they managed to figure out a way to get rid of this weed. I wish there was one to get rid of the gray rabbit brush that's really beginning to get on my nerves around here as the bushes are coming closer and closer and closer..

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    1. I'm not certain where I first heard about the mites as control. The State Dept of Agriculture has about 10 bio-controls for weeds. You might check with California to see if they have come up with something for the gray rabbit brush.

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  9. Wow, I've never heard of that.

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  10. A friend & I toured a garden on Sandy Ridge Rd. (on Battery Creek adjacent to Salem Pt.) this morning. I learned that "one man's weed is another man's flower" as there was a variety of iris and a variety of fern in the garden that Sharon has been *removing* from her yard in Sea Pines. I also saw a lilly being nurtured that in past years volunteered in my yard.

    Actually, I'm not certain that I have the patience to be a "green gardener". Be sure to post "before" and "after" pics once the mites go to work!

    Anne

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