Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Vege Garden

I have been working in my vegetable garden recently, despite the white 'rain' we've experienced. I actually prepared two raised beds on an especially nice day in early April. It was wonderful to augment our sandy soil with lovely, composted Haffie poop!

 Garden Preparation - My Method for Turning the Garden

First Step: add 1-2" of compost evenly over the garden:

Second Step: dig soil from one end of the garden and reserve for later:

Third Step: dig the soil adjacent to the rench, turn it and use it to fill the trench, breaking up clumps and mixing compost and soil. Work down the garden or bed filling the new trench you create:

Fourth Step: use soil held in reserve, mixed with compost, to fill in at the end of the bed:

We constructed four raised beds a few years ago. We used 2" X 12" lumber with hardware cloth stapled across the bottom. This has helped keep the ground dwelling pests away from our vegetables. However, we want more! So, we are slowing expanding our garden beyond the raised beds. The lattice which is visible in the last picture was used to create a wind break as well as to support pole beans that I planted on the other side. Sadly, our weather was so cool last year that the beans didn't grow more than 12"! Maybe this year!

I've already planted some cool weather veges, such as beets, spinach, onions and peas. Most of our planting won't happen until after Memorial Day, our traditional 'last frost' date - ha! Don't believe it! We have to be prepared to cover young vege's well into June.

1 comment:

  1. Wonderful garden. We stopped planting veggies a few years ago, too much work not enough time.

    As far as I have tried in the way of bitless the Nurtural bridle gave me the most precision and best control. If your looking to drive your horse I would suggest that. Dr.cooks or other similar made cross under they lean on and the pressure on the rein straps become uneven. My friends mare literally had a "dent" in her nose after driving her mare in a cooks.
    Like I said though, I support all bitless (minus mechanical hackamores that use curbs and base their effectiveness off the pain created by the curb on the mental nerve) I will be doing a post likely when I get back from Ireland on different bitless I have tried.

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